PODCAST 1-15


Our favorite co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Cameron Pike are back to discuss a few of their favorite things. They kick it off with a poem by Dylan Thomas Jones, “Danny in Blue,” from our 2015 issue.  Then, we hear the poem “Roads” by Edward Thomas, read by Mochila Review staff member, Samantha Bolduc. Finally, our traveling correspondent Samantha Bolduc talks about the University of Arizona’s Masters of Fine Arts and Creative Writing program.


Co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Cameron Pike discuss the correlation between friendships and relationships in creative writing. They kick it off with a short story by Jordan Carter, “We do Shit to get High to Forget the Shit we do to get High,” last year’s MoRe Prize contest winner.  Then, we hear the poem “Love and Friendship” by Emily Brontë, read by Mochila Review staff member, Samantha Bolduc. Finally, our traveling correspondent Samantha Bolduc talks about the University of Montana’s Master’s of Fine Arts program.


Co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Cameron Pike discuss the unlucky number 13, kicking it off with a short story by Marcus Rigsby, “Cat Gods and Birdhouse Altars,” from our newest issue. The co-hosts discuss the rituals they have performed in the past to bring them luck in their various endeavors. Then, we hear the poem “A Fixed Idea” by Amy Lowell, read by Mochila Review staff member, Samantha Bolduc. Finally, we hear from our traveling correspondent Samantha Bolduc gives us the 411 on the University of Missouri St. Louis’ Master’s of Fine Arts program.


Say “I do” to this episode by hitting play! Here co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Cameron Pike discuss the intersections of writing and marriage, kicking it off with a poem by Morgan Boyle, “Ode to that Man on 12th and P who Simply Must Heckle Every Woman who Walks Past,” from our 2015 issue. Then we listen to Edward Thomas’s poem “The Cherry Tree” while the co-hosts ask themselves, how has the institution of marriage changed over time? Why take the plunge at all? Could marriage possibly be like writing, in that you’re not ready to commit to a subject (or person) until the right one comes along? Finally, traveling correspondent Cameron Price gives us the 411 on the University of South Carolina’s Master’s of Fine Arts program.


T. S. Eliot’s poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is all about the failure of language — when we can’t say what we mean, when we don’t mean what we say, when others misunderstand us, and so on. In this episode, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Cameron Pike consider the whats, whens, and hows of language. Charles King-Hagen reads “Down from the Mountain” from our 2015 issue, and we hear William Butler Yeats’ poem “Politics.” Our traveling co-host Cameron Price takes a fake hot air balloon to University of Nebraska-Omaha to share information about its MFA program.


Not only is Mochila Chat a “gift to your ears,” now we’re bringing you a whole episode on gifts! This is also the episode in which we welcome our new co-host Cameron Pike, taking the place of Lindsey Lucas who has graduated (congrats, Lindsey!). Cameron and Chris Pankiewicz discuss well-meaning but strange gifts, the gift of language, and war-time gifts. Hear Jane Huffman’s poem “Letter to My Alchemist” from our 2015 issue alongside Walt Whitman’s “O Tan-Faced Prairie Boy.” New traveling co-host Cameron Price stops by Louisiana State University’s MFA program…well, he pretends to anyway!


If you’ve read any of Emily Dickinson’s poetry, you know that punctuation matters. In this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas consider the importance of parentheses, semi-colons, ampersands, and more in both poetry and prose. Hear Kate Belew’s poem “Spooky Little Girl,” a runner-up for the Undergraduate MoRe Prize in 2015, as well as Dickinson’s “Much Madness is Divinest Sense.” Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford delivers the facts about the Master’s of Fine Arts program at the University of Virginia.


Should you write about family? What if that writing is critical; should you then publish it? In this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas tackle these tough ethical questions. They find answers in Eran E. Eads’ poem “[My grandmother says I’m cold],” winner of our Undergraduate MoRe Prize, and also in Elizabeth Drew Barstow Stoddard’s classic poem “Nameless Pain.” Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford reports on the Master’s of Fine Arts program in the University of Wisconsin-Madison.


On this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas talk about the influence of travel and place on poetry and fiction. We introduce a new segment titled “Why We Chose It” featuring the Editor-in-Chief of The Mochila Review, Dr. Marianne Kunkel. We hear a short story titled, “What the Water Said” by undergraduate writer Tara Lynn Fritz. Mochila Chat Producer Bob Nulph reads a poem by Edward Thomas titled “Adlestrop,” which describes a village in England from a train. Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford takes an imaginary trip to tell us about The University of Florida’s Masters of Fine Arts program.


On this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas talk about the influence of music on poetry and fiction. We hear “The Piano Calms It” by Amy Randall, read by the author. Theatre student Ronald Baker reads “The Poet and His Song” by Paul Laurence Dunbar. Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford takes an imaginary trip to tell us about Oregon State University’s Masters of Fine Arts program.


On this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas talk about the use of food in fiction and the connections that people have with food.  We hear, “i buy two hotdogs instead” by Colleen Trittipo, read by the author, and theatre student Eric Bermsprung reads “Thompson’s Lunch Room – Grand Central Station” by Amy Lowell. Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford takes an imaginary trip to tell us about The University of Baltimore’s Masters in Fine Arts program.


On this episode of Mochila Chat, co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas talk about home and homesickness in fiction. We hear “The Necessity” by Isabel Vazquez, read by the author. Theater student Ronald Baker reads “On an Unsociable Family” by Elizabeth Hands. Traveling co-host Crystal Crawford takes an imaginary trip to tell us about Georgia State University’s Masters in Fine Arts program.


Are adjectives too overused, or are they useful? Co-hosts Chris Pankiewicz and Lindsey Lucas tackle the question in alk,” read by Ronald Baker. Co-hosts Lindsey Lucas and Chris Pankiewicz talk about animals in writing. Adriann Dunn introduces us to the MFA program at Iowa State University.
Image: “Laughing Blue Pig” by Robin Hegemier.


This episode features Steven Amen’s “How to Raise a Pig,” read by the author, and Emily Dickinson’s “A Bird Came Down the Walk,” read by Ronald Baker. Co-hosts Lindsey Lucas and Chris Pankiewicz talk about animals in writing. Adriann Dunn introduces us to the MFA program at Iowa State University.
Image: “Laughing Blue Pig” by Robin Hegemier.


Co-hosts Lindsey Lucas and Chris Pankiewicz talk about authors who write about daily routines. Featuring Colleen Trittipo’s “Routine,” read by the author, and Thomas Hardy’s “The Voice,” read by Erik Burns-Sprung. Adriann Dunn gives us a look at Antioch University’s Masters program in creative writing.
Image: “Ink Wash” by Aaron Gerber.